As Black History Month dawns, I find it hard not to think and reflect upon the “The Great Migration” — and not the current “great migration,” aka “The Great Resignation,” for which, at times, “Great Migration” has instead been used inappropriately. I mean the real, the original Great Migration, where more than 6 million African Americans fled the rural South for the urban centers of opportunity in the Northeast, Midwest, and Western states from approximately 1910-1970. 

Let’s be clear not to conflate or co-opt these two. Principally, the Great Migration was about Black Americans escaping the South's violence, racism, and oppression by becoming migrants in their own country, while “The Great Resignation/Reshuffle/Reprioritization,” etc., is centrally about expressing and acting on choice — a perceived or given one, at that.